All You Need to Know about NAACP

The national association for the advancement of colored people is represented by an acronym NAACP. In 1905 is the year that the group can trace its origin. The challenges facing colored people in America were discussed by a group of important and like-minded African Americans when they began to meet in 1905. That period was known as the Niagara movement and that not all members of the original movement became part of the NAACP as their quiz shows. The group met across the border of Niagara Falls because hotels were segregated at that time and in Canada, such segregation did not exist. Although it did not take that name until the following year from when the NAACP was officially created in 1909. To make sure that citizens of color were going to get equal rights was the goal of the organization immediately from the offset. Suffrage, employment, justice, and education among other areas of concern were some of the rights. The specific target was the Jim Crow Laws in the south that endorsed segregation.

NAACP effects can not be underestimated because, in the American armed forces, African Americans were helped to become officers. Lynching constantly was fought against and steady and slow progress towards desegregation began. In many civil rights cases throughout the country, they helped to provide legal help. In the NAACP’s history, there are many important figures. Thurgood Marshall, of their legal department or Rosa Parks, instrumental in the Montgomery bus boycotts and as a rallying figure for the organization might be mentioned in the NAACP quiz. At the march on Washington jobs and freedom, Martin Luther King Jr. would deliver his most famous speech of all time.

NAACP was the large organizations of the march. They were one of several factions that were disagreeing as to what the true intent of the movement should have been although it was important to note that while the NAACP was instrumental in the historic march. President George w. bush has the dubious distinction of being the first president in seventy years who did not address the NAACP hence it is an interesting point of recent history. In 2006 he finally spoke at their national convention after declining their invitations for five years.

The support and level of influence Wilkins wielded on the issue of civil rights initiatives from president Johnson was well aware. Before each major speech, Johnson made on civil rights and after each civil rights crisis, he was on the phone with Wilkins. On one of their many phone conversations when Johnson in mid-sentence discussion of an issue was when the congenial nature of their friendship surfaced. Getting to the president when Wilkins called was never that troublesome. From the mainstream sources, Wilkins was likewise aware of the support NAACP received. If he or other officials of the organizational expressed disapproval of the war effort, he likely feared recrimination. In Vietnam, Wilkins’s support of Johnson’s policies appeared at odds with the NAACP’s own civil rights agenda at home.

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